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New campaign encouraging people to buy only what they need

When it comes to food, are we Spoiled Rotten?

New campaign encouraging people to buy only what they need to reduce the 7.1 million tonnes of food wasted every year in UK homes

 

  • One in four people admit they are poor at judging the right amount of food to buy.
  • In the UK, 20% of the food we buy ends up in the bin, according to research by Love Food Hate Waste.

 

In the Liverpool City Region food and drink makes up two-thirds of what goes in our bins. That wasted food costs money – roughly £230 per person annually in the UK – and the amount of C02 it emits is equal to that generated by 1 in 4 of the cars on our roads. But this doesn’t have to be the case.

We shop without checking what we’ve already got at home. We cook too much pasta because it’s difficult to know how much to make. Our busy lives mean we often leave salads to wilt in their bags, end up chucking out half a loaf of stale bread, and find forgotten punnets of gone-off fruit because we overestimate how much we’ll eat. When it comes to food, we’re spoiled rotten.

That is why Love Food Hate Waste have launched the new Spoiled Rotten campaign which is calling on people to take individual action and spot their food waste traps, from over-buying milk “just in case” to buying a bag of apples when the recipe only needs one or two. Some 30% of people say they don’t check their fridge before they go out to the shops, and nearly half of us forget to check the freezer. Furthermore, only 56% of 18–34-year-olds make a shopping list, and research shows that this group wastes more food than most.

If lists aren’t your thing, why not grab your phone and take a picture of the contents of your fridge – a #FridgeShelfie – before you leave the house? It’s a quick and easy way of remembering what’s in there when you get to the shops. Furthermore, a #shelfie doesn’t have to just mean the fridge! Check the cupboards and freezer before you head out, too.

Other top tips to only buy what you need and waste less:

  • One potato, two potato… ask yourself if you need the whole big bag or if it might be better to pick a few loose ones. Smaller packs are also an option – when it comes to loaves of bread, bigger isn’t always better! Research shows that there is a higher rate of food waste per person in single-person households, so if you’re buying for one try a smaller pack.
  • Get freezer friendly. If your fresh fruit is going off before you can eat it all, try buying frozen instead. It lasts longer and can be whizzed up into a delicious smoothie.
  • Takeout tips. If you’ve been tempted by a takeaway, check what’s in your fridge before you order – you might have something to pop in the freezer to keep it from going off.
  • Visit our Instagram account (@LFHW_UK) on Tuesday 11th June to get some top tips from Masterchef quarter-finalist Imran Nathoo. He’ll be taking over our account for the day to showcase some brilliant ways to buy what you need.

 Jenny Carr from Love Food Hate Waste said: “We enjoy an abundance of food everywhere we go, from farmers’ markets and supermarkets to restaurants and cafes. It’s never been easier to enjoy food. The problem is, that means it’s also never been easier to waste it. UK households produce 70% of the country’s overall food waste – 7.1 million tonnes – which is equal to 3.5 meals per person every week!

“It’s easy to be tempted– we’re only human after all! However, if it’s going to end up in the bin, don’t buy it. By buying what you need, you can save your food from the bin – helping your pocket and our planet.”

Councillor Tony Concepcion, Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority, said: “The Liverpool City Region is committed to reducing food waste, and we’ve been inspired by the activity that Love Food Hate Waste have been doing to raise awareness about the issue. We’d love to see more people taking action – whether they take a shelfie before they shop, just making a shopping list or buying smaller portions to avoid waste. We throw away the equivalent of three-and-a-half meals per person every week in the UK. This is an opportunity for all of us to make a difference.”

ENDS

Notes to editors

The campaign website: www.lovefoodhatewaste.com/spoiledrotten.

About the research

About Love Food Hate Waste (LFHW)

Love Food Hate Waste (LFHW) is a campaign from the not-for-profit organisation WRAP. The campaign aims to raise awareness of the need to reduce the amount of food being thrown away and help citizens take action. It shows that by doing some easy practical everyday things at home we can all waste less food, which will ultimately benefit our purses and the environment too.

 

Don’t just eat it – compleat it! (22 January 2019)

Compleating is simple.

It’s about eating the whole ingredient or food and letting no edible parts go to waste. Getting the best value from the food you buy. Making the most of our food’s nutrients. Saving the hassle of peeling and unlocking a whole load of flavour potential.

Compleating also reduces food waste, so the planet benefits as much as you do.

So, join the revolution, eat well and feel good about your food.

DID YOU KNOW?

One third of the food produced globally goes to waste. This is a problem of epic proportions that impacts us financially, socially and environmentally. In the UK, 10 million tonnes of food is wasted every year, with around 70% of that coming from our homes. This means there is a huge opportunity for us as individuals to make a positive difference and reduce the amount of food we waste at home.

Surprisingly, our everyday preferences are responsible for a huge amount of food waste, as many of us choose to ignore the skins, leaves, stalks and crusts of our favourite foods.

Do your bit.

Don’t just eat it.

Compleat it.

For tips, tricks and recipes go to – www.lovefoodhatewaste.com/compleating

Save money and waste less this Christmas (1 Dec 2016)

Struggling to find gifts for loved ones? It’s never too late – just shop smart!

Local recycling officers are asking people to shop smart this Christmas in a bid to save money and create less waste.

December can be a time when we tend to overindulge, that’s why Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority have come up with tips to follow so local residents can slim their shopping, cut their clutter and make their money go further.

Councillor Graham Morgan, Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA), said: “At this time of year you can end up with a lot of clutter around the house, too much food and a lot of paper, card and plastic which unnecessarily ends up in landfill. By planning what you buy, using what you already have, making lists and shopping smarter you will save yourself time and money as well as creating less waste.

“Food and clothes are two particular things that people can end up spending too much on, when there are ways of saving money and still getting what you want.”

Our top waste prevention tips:

• Before you go out shopping write a list and stick to it, as you’re less likely to make an impulsive and unnecessary buy which you didn’t need.

• When out shopping remember to take re-usable bags with you.

• Consider buying an experience for someone – concert tickets, a pampering day, or tickets to a tourist attraction.

• 30% of our clothes haven’t been worn in the last year so search the back of wardrobes and drawers to find your party outfit rather than buying a new one.

• Accessorise – bring an old outfit to life by customising it with some new additions.

• Instead of wrapping paper, use gift bags which have got a much longer life and can be used over and over again.

• When it comes to meals try planning in advance when and what you’re going to be cooking, that way you won’t buy too much. Research from Christmas 2015* showed that British shoppers spent £2.3bn on food items in the two weeks to Christmas – an 8.8% increase in food expenditure compared to the same period in 2014.

• Cook once eat twice – by carefully cooking more than you need and freezing the extra portions you can eat them another time.

• Non-frozen leftovers should be wrapped, kept in the fridge and eaten within two days. Use clear takeaway containers to help you see what you have left and maybe add the date on the packet when you put it in the freezer.

• If you’ve got a home composter then remember to add in Christmas leftovers like fruit and veg peelings. Also add unwanted paper and card. And if you haven’t got a composter, then maybe ask for one as a gift!

• Remember to take full advantage of your local Household Waste Recycling Centre. There are 14 throughout Merseyside with most accepting a whole host of items such as cans, cardboard, real Christmas trees, glass jars and bottles, paper, scrap metal, textiles, toys and white goods. All the Centres accept electrical items.

• If there are items like toys, electrical items, bric-a-brac you don’t need after Christmas, you could donate them to the Emmaus Community Reuse Shop at our South Sefton Recycling Centre.

Carl Beer, Chief Executive of MRWA, said: “A huge amount of rubbish is generated at this time of year but alongside that there is a great opportunity to promote a message of saving money, consuming less, creating less waste and recycling as much as we can.”

For more recycling and waste prevention tips and Christmas recipe ideas visit www.recycleformerseysideandhalton.com.

ENDS
Notes to editor:

*http://www.foodbev.com/news/uks-christmas-food-spending-grows-8-8-to-2-3bn/

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is a statutory authority established in 1986, following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, to undertake the household waste disposal functions for local authorities across Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and the safe and effective disposal of household waste for Merseyside’s residents.

The Merseyside and Halton Waste Partnership is made up of MRWA, plus the District Councils of Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Knowsley.
www.merseysidewda.gov.uk
www.twitter.com/merseysiderwa
www.facebook.com/merseysiderwa

Media enquiries:

John Lally
Marketing and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
Direct Dial: 0151 255 2568
General enquiries: 0151 255 1444
www.merseysidewda.gov.uk
www.twitter.com/merseysiderwa
www.facebook.com/merseysiderwa

Mersey community groups clinch £110,000 environmental fund (15 June 2016)

Ten Merseyside and Halton community groups have received a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place.

The financial shot-in-the-arm will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions.

The £110,000 is coming from the Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund 2016/17, which has been running annually since 2006.

Projects funded include the repair and re-use of unused furniture, cookery clubs to help reduce food waste, a scheme to increase recycling with Liverpool’s Roma community, bicycle repair and re-use, an interactive large-scale artwork in Liverpool city centre, and unwanted wood and timber waste re-use at a local community farm.

Successful applicants have been awarded up to £25,000 for schemes which operate across Merseyside and Halton, and up to £8,000 for projects which work solely at local authority level.

Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA), Councillor Graham Morgan, said: “We’ve made this money available for projects which can have an impact on their local community and make Merseyside and Halton a cleaner and greener place for us all to live and work. Giving groups the opportunity to get involved in looking after their environment can only bring benefits to all and can help us appreciate items as valuable resources rather than something which otherwise might be just thrown away.”

Details of each project:

Centre 63 – Bike Back 63 (Knowsley): The ‘Bike Back 63’ project will take in unwanted bikes from the Knowsley community and cheap bikes from auctions then refurbish them to a state ‘as new’ before selling them at an affordable price back into the local community. This scheme will give young people the opportunity to learn about cycle repair and maintenance and earn their own bike.

The Children’s Food Trust – Mersey Waste Munchers (Merseyside & Halton): The Trust will set up 20 ‘Mersey Waste Muncher’ clubs – targeting young adults aged 16-25 and providing a two-day course, arming club leaders with the skills and support to establish cookery clubs that focus on reducing food waste. Clubs will receive funding, training and printed resources to teach others how to change their food waste behaviour.

Emmaus Merseyside – Upcycle It (Sefton): Upcycle It is about giving homeless people the skills to design and make attractive furniture and household accessories from waste otherwise destined for landfill. Customers at the Emmaus superstore in Seaforth will be buying the fashionable upcycled products created by volunteers.

Faiths4Change – Turning the Tables (Merseyside & Halton): Turning the Tables will deliver a series of learning workshops enabling people to gain skills to revitalise unwanted furniture and textiles, simultaneously contributing to an interactive artwork to be exhibited in Liverpool city centre next spring.

Granby Toxteth Development Trust – Recycle L1578 (Liverpool): The Trust will build upon their work with local disadvantaged communities, including whose first language isn’t English, to improve awareness of the opportunities to waste less and re-use and recycle more.

Halton Play Council – Scrapstore (Halton): Halton Play Council operates a re-use Scrapstore and children’s Play Resource Centre in Runcorn, which is open to the general public and community groups and supports the work of their children’s charity. The grant will help promote the Scrapstore to the local community and encourage more donations of reusable items like toys, furniture and textiles. Volunteers will be trained in the collection, repair and retail of these reusable resources.

HoneyRose Foundation – Storage Facility (St Helens): This project will provide improved storage facilities for the HoneyRose Foundation’s charity shops allowing increased re-use and recycling of furniture and other donated household materials. The facility will also provide a workshop area to facilitate the repair and reuse of items.

Liverpool Guild of Students – Leave Liverpool Tidy (Liverpool): Leave Liverpool Tidy is a reduce, reuse, and recycle project which aims to reduce the amount of reusable items going to landfill at the end of the academic year. The project will collect unwanted materials and redistribute cleaned and repaired items back to new students and the local community through free shops.

Neighbourhood Services Company – Reusing Waste Wood for Improved Environmental Facilities at Home Farm (Knowsley and Liverpool): The project will be located at NSC’s Home Farm in Croxteth Park and will re-use waste wood from domestic properties and gardens to improve visitor facilities and livestock conditions at the farm and provide training opportunities in re-use.

Sustrans – Eastham Centre Community Cycling Hub (Wirral): The Eastham Centre Community Cycling Hub delivers cycling activities to adults with learning difficulties and the local community. In this new project the Cycling Hub will employ a qualified bike mechanic to repair and maintain bicycles, upcycle old bicycles for reuse, and deliver bike maintenance courses to Centre users.

legh_vale_nov2015

Carl Beer, Chief Executive of MRWA, said: “It was a tough job having to sort through some excellent applications. The projects picked for funding really seem to understand the importance of resource efficiency and community education. We’re really looking forward to seeing what they achieve.”

Groundwork Cheshire, Lancashire and Merseyside are one organisation to have previously benefitted from the Community Fund. Groundwork’s Project Manager, Jon Hutchinson, said: “MRWA’s Community Fund has been pivotal in enabling Project UP to establish a furniture upcycling base in Widnes. We teach young unemployed people how to restore beaten up items of furniture and we donate them back into the community. This year we also delivered a series of roadshow events teaching members of the public how to transform their own furniture and avoid throwing out perfectly usable items.”

Projects have until March 2017 to deliver their schemes.

The impact of the 2015/16 Community Fund saw 71 full time equivalent jobs created or safeguarded, participation by 253 volunteers, 680 tonnes of waste material diverted from landfill and £68,000 of equivalent landfill costs avoided.

 

ENDS

Note to editors

Picture captions of previous Community Fund projects (2015/16):
(G31A6563): Onya Bike scheme in Kensington – Left to right, MRWA waste strategy policy officer Glynn Stevenson, Onya volunteer Frank Maddocks and Kensington Vision CIC director Stephen Faragher inside the bike shop.
(G31A1694sml): Legh Vale Primary School in Haydock – pupils with headteacher Andy Howard (back, right) and MRWA waste strategy policy officer Glynn Stephenson (left) in the school garden.
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.
Media contact:

John Lally
Marketing and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
Direct Dial: 0151 255 2568
General enquiries: 0151 255 1444
www.merseysidewda.gov.uk
www.twitter.com/merseysiderwa
www.facebook.com/merseysiderwa

Don’t waste your waste – get composting this autumn (2nd Nov 2015)

  • Local recycling officers are encouraging Merseyside residents to get composting

 

The warm summer weather and tropical rainstorms this year have helped our gardens to bloom and flourish, but summer is well over and the time has come to prune, trim and prepare the garden for next year. So what should you do with all the extra garden waste?

Get composting of course!

Don’t look at it as waste; your old garden debris has the potential to give you a free supply of top quality compost with very little effort. Simply put it into a compost bin and over the winter months it will rot down to produce environmentally friendly compost that when added to the garden will suppress weeds and retain moisture throughout the dry months.

To encourage residents to get composting, Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority has teamed up with www.getcomposting.com to offer home compost bins at special offer prices from only £17.98 (RRP £39). There is also a buy one get one half price offer to purchase a second bin from only £8.99.

Carl Beer, Chief Executive of MRWA, said: “Almost half of the waste in the average St Helens household bin can be composted and although many households already compost at home, we want others to get involved. This is a great incentive to encourage more residents to get composting and share the rewards. Home composting organic waste, paper and cardboard also helps to significantly reduce carbon emissions and can also be used as an effective and sustainable waste management method to reduce the amount of waste sent to landfill.”

Benefits of home composting:

• It’s easy to make and easy to use.

• Produces a free continual source of the very best compost.

• Improves soil structure.

• Maintains moisture.

• Helps the soil PH balance.

• Suppresses plant disease.

• Reduces the need for polluting bonfires.

• Reduces carbon emissions

• Helps to divert organic waste from landfill.

• Reduces refuse collection costs.

Getcomposting have exclusive offers on a range of other great green products, including special offer water butts with buy one get one half price and a selection of gardening accessories.

To see what’s available in your area visit www.merseyside.getcomposting.com or call 0844 571 4444.

ENDS

The buy one get one half price offer is available on selected products. A one-off delivery charge of £5.99 applies.

 

MRWA is a local government body with nine elected members from the five constituent councils in Merseyside. It organises and manages disposal of all waste collected by the five councils and operates 13 Household Waste Recycling Facilities. www.merseysidewda.gov.uk

 

Celebrity Chef is Cooking up ways to Prevent Food Waste (11 March 2015)

Top TV chef, Richard Fox will be showing residents in Liverpool what to do with their leftover ingredients and food waste as he cooks up some fantastic recipes.

On the 12th & 13th March Richard will be supporting the Love Food Hate Waste Campaign launched in the city last summer, by sharing her expertise with residents at the free cookery event at Williamson Square organised by Love Food Hate Waste. A further event is taking place from 10am to 4pm at Liverpool Constellations, Baltic Triangle on 22nd March.

He will dish out advice and tips on how to cook great tasting recipes with leftover ingredients, how to make your food last longer and money saving ideas. The cookery demonstrations will take place between 10am and 4pm.

The event is part of the 10 cities campaign which encourages residents in 10 cities of the UK to reduce food waste, which could save the average family up to £700 a year

Richard Fox commented: “This is an exciting event for me to be involved with, it not only saves people lots of money to reduce food waste but they can have a great deal of fun learning how to cook the easy recipes we show them”.

Recipe suggestions can also be found on www.lovefoodhatewaste.com

The event is taking place from 10am to 4pm at Williamson Square L1 1EJ. For further information call: 01295 819 663

-ENDS-

For further information please contact:

 

Sally Hollyhead – Love Food Hate Waste PR – Project manager

M: 07712 853 656
D: 01295 819 663
E: sally.hollyhead@wrap.org.uk
Editors notes:
About WRAP

  • Love Food Hate Waste is brought to you by WRAP. WRAP is a registered Charity No. 1159512 WRAP is also backed by government funding from England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.
  • WRAP works with businesses, individuals and communities to help them reap the benefits of reducing waste, developing sustainable products and using resources in an efficient way.
  • More information on all of WRAP’s programmes can be found on www.wrap.org.uk
  • LFHW
  • @WRAP_UK
  • Love Food Hate Waste is brought to you by WRAP and its work is underpinned by ground-breaking, evidence-based WRAP research
  • The most recent food waste figures available are for 2012 – these were published by WRAP in November 2013 and can be found here: http://www.wrap.org.uk/content/household-food-and-drink-waste-uk-2012
  • The average person in the UK could save £200 a year by not buying and then throwing away good food and drink. This rises to £470 for the average household and £700 for a family with children.
  • Throwing away good food and drink is responsible for the equivalent of 17mt of C02.
  • The campaign aims to help us all to realise the importance of developing skills in order to help everyone to save money and reduce food waste. www.lovefoodhatewaste.com
  • @LFHW_UK

This Christmas shop smart, save money and waste less (5 Dec 2014)

  • Cook once, eat twice and save money

  • Get your Christmas clothes sparkling for less

 

Local waste prevention and recycling officers are asking people to shop smart this Christmas and New Year in a bid to save money and create less waste.

December can be a time when we tend to overindulge, that’s why the Merseyside and Halton Waste Partnership has come up with some tips to follow so local residents can slim their shopping, cut their clutter and make their money go further.

Carl Beer, Chief Executive of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority, said: “At this time of year you can end up with a lot of clutter around the house, too much food and a lot of paper, card and plastic which unnecessarily ends up in landfill. By planning what you buy, using what you already have, making lists and shopping smarter you will save yourself time and money as well as creating less waste.

“Food and clothes are two particular things that people can end up spending too much on, when there are ways of saving money and still getting what you want.”

Top waste prevention tips:

– Before you go out shopping write a list and stick to it, as you’re less likely to make an impulsive and unnecessary buy which you didn’t need.

– When out shopping remember to take re-usable bags with you.

– Use any Christmas cards you got last year as gift tags.

– Instead of wrapping paper, use gift bags which have got a much longer life and can be used over and over again.

– When it comes to meals try planning in advance when and what you’re going to be cooking, that way you won’t buy too much.

– Cook once eat twice – by carefully cooking more than you need and freezing the extra portions you can eat them another time.

– Non-frozen leftovers should be wrapped, kept in the fridge and eaten within two days. Use clear takeaway containers to help you see what you have left.

– If you’ve got a home composter then remember to add in Christmas leftovers like fruit and veg peelings. Also add unwanted paper and card. And if you haven’t got a composter, then maybe ask for one as a gift!

– 30% of our clothes haven’t been worn in the last year so search the back of wardrobes and drawers to find your party outfit rather than buying a new one.

– Accessorise – bring an old outfit to life by customising it with some new additions.

– Remember to take full advantage of your local Household Waste Recycling Centre. There are 15 throughout Merseyside and Halton with most accepting a whole host of items such as cans, cardboard, real Christmas trees, glass jars and bottles, paper, scrap metal, textiles, toys and white goods. All the Centres accept electrical items.

Carl Beer continued: “A huge amount of rubbish is generated at this time of year but alongside that there is a great opportunity to promote a message of saving money, consuming less, creating less waste and recycling as much as we can.”

For more recycling and waste prevention tips and Christmas recipe ideas visit www.recycleformerseysideandhalton.com.

ENDS

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is a statutory authority established in 1986, following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, to undertake the household waste disposal functions for local authorities across Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and the safe and effective disposal of household waste for Merseyside’s residents.

The Merseyside and Halton Waste Partnership is made up of MRWA, plus the District Councils of Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Knowsley.
Media enquiries:
John Lally
PR and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
Direct telephone: 0151 255 2568
General telephone: 0151 255 1444

Are we in danger of losing basic cooking skills? (2nd Dec 2014)

 

● Love Food Hate Waste is setting out to help restore lost culinary skills.

● Almost a quarter of parents surveyed via Mumsnet (24%) were not confident they could use leftovers to make another meal without resorting to a recipe.

●Building skills in the kitchen is vital if the UK is to tackle the £12.5 billion of good food and drink that gets thrown away from UK homes each year.

Cooking is, without a doubt, one of the most important life skills a person can ever learn and share. There was a time when most of us knew how to cook at some level. Skills and recipes used to be passed down from generation to generation but these skills have been diluted over the last few decades which is why Love Food Hate Waste is setting out to enrich our culinary skills to help fight food waste.

As modern life becomes busier, and quick solutions become more favourable, we are at risk of losing valuable cooking skills and knowledge to pass on to the next generation. According to new research carried out by Love Food Hate Waste and Mumsnet, although more than 90% of parents rate cooking skills as an important part of their general education, over 60% of parents (with children over the age of three) spend three hours or less a month cooking with their child. Sometimes life can just get too busy.

We’ve become too busy to cook and nearly 40% of people say that the speed of preparation is amongst the most important things they consider when preparing a meal, which could often mean foregoing homemade meals. A further three in five say one of the most important things they consider when preparing a meal is the likelihood of it being eaten.

Not only can a lack of food knowledge and cooking skills have a negative impact on our health and our children’s healthbut having these skills can also save us money and help to reduce household food waste. The research also revealed that the two top skills that parents want to pass onto their children to help them make the most of their food are planning meals in advance and how to make use of leftovers.

To regain a potentially lost generation of cookers, Love Food Hate Waste has launched ‘Save More’ kitchen skills packs to help people get to grips with budgeting, planning, and portioning in the kitchen along with money saving tools and tips. The pack is available to download from www.lovefoodhatewaste.com. In the New Year the campaign is also launching free cookery classes in 10 UK cities to help people with the basics of cookery and learn new ways to get creative in the kitchen. The campaign aims to raise awareness of the need to reduce food waste and help the average family not waste up to £700 a year buying and then throwing away what was once good food and drink. It shows that by doing some easy practical everyday things in the home we can all waste less food, which will ultimately benefit our purses and the environment too.

Emma Marsh, Head of Love Food Hate Waste said: “Cooking skills are a key life skill for all of us. But most of us lack the time to build these up, leading to a lack of confidence in the kitchen. Our range of tools and guidance on lovefoodhatewaste.com now enhanced by our new Save More initiative are designed to increase everyone’s skills, knowledge and confidence and enable these to be passed onto the next generation..”

ENDS

For further information please contact:

Sally Hollyhead – Love Food Hate Waste PR Project manager

M: 07712 853 656

D: 01295 819 663

E: sally.hollyhead@wrap.org.uk