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Mersey community project gets creative with recycling (20 November 2018)

It’s a case of ‘so far, sew good’ for a community scheme in Northwood, Kirkby, that is using creative arts and crafts to help encourage recycling.

The Northwood CommuniTree 4aRts project is working across the Northwood area in a bid to engage local residents and get them to think about reducing waste and boosting re-use and recycling.

The project is being delivered by Faiths4Change – a registered charity which uses arts, health and wellbeing activities to engage with communities on environmental matters – in partnership with Northwood Together and Knowsley Council.

Faiths4Change has received over £7000 of funding for the project, which comes from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund 2018/19. The Fund was set up to help support waste prevention, re-use and recycling projects locally.

Northwood in Kirkby has traditionally low levels of recycling. By working with the Community Fund and Knowsley Council, Faiths4Change hope to create clear and consistent behavioural change messages through arts and crafts activities to help the local community turn these statistics around.

The project will conclude with the Northwood ‘CommuniTree’ Resources exhibition featuring items created by local people at the workshops, a 3D CommuniTree sculpture made of recycled plastic bottles and a canopy made from recycled materials such as textiles.

Liz Atherton, Arts & Wellbeing Project Co-ordinator at Faiths4Change, said: “By bringing together old and young, groups, schools, and organisations from across Northwood we can all create a really positive environmental noise about, with and for the area. There is a wonderful community spirit here and you see it every day at the Community Centre.

“Ultimately the project is about helping to build community spirit, break down barriers and provide educational benefits to enable all to improve the environment for future generations in Northwood.”

By the end of the project in March 2019, Faiths4Change expect that they will have:

– Re-used or recycled 6.7 tonnes of materials (including textiles, plastics and bulky family items such as cots and prams)

– Held 6 Swap Shops for textiles, bulky items and toys

– Held 12 clothing repair clinics

– Hosted 64 sewing and craft workshops to create ‘textile tree banners’

– Delivered recycling guides directly to 500 households

– Engaged with 8 schools for Bags2School clothing collections

Twelve volunteering opportunities have also been created in partnership with Northwood Together. Faiths4Change are hoping that local volunteers, with the right support, will encourage engagement amongst family, peers and neighbours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lou Smith is one local resident for whom the scheme has made a difference. Lou said: “I’ve been getting involved in the sewing classes, the Pop Up Boutiques and making art work for Northwood Community Centre. There’s a really nice, friendly atmosphere and it’s been great to dust off the sewing skills I haven’t used for a few years. You just hope that it does have an effect and people in the area will start recycling more – I’m sure they will. It’s a great community and people just need the right information to help them do what they need to do.”

Councillor Tony Concepcion, Chairperson of MRWA, said: “The best Community Fund projects are those that help deliver recycling and waste resource messages to local communities – using groups’ expertise and on-the-ground knowledge of particular areas and the people who live there. The work Faiths4Change and the Northwood Together are doing will see a positive effect on recycling levels.”

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Image captions (left to right):
MRWA_F4C 1   Marlene Robinson, Lisa Cover, Liz Atherton and Julia Adlington stitch the Northwood CommuniTree.
MRWA_F4C 2  Julia Adlington, Liz Atherton, Marlene Robinson and Lisa Cover stitch the Northwood CommuniTree.

MRWA is a local government body with nine elected members from the five constituent councils in Merseyside. It organises and manages disposal of all waste collected by the five councils and operates 14 Household Waste Recycling Facilities. www.merseysidewda.gov.uk

The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 2018/19 has seen 14 community groups from Merseyside and Halton receive a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions.

Members of the media for more information please contact:

John Lally
Marketing and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
Direct Dial: 0151 255 2568
John.lally@merseysidewda.gov.uk
General enquiries: 0151 255 1444

Kirkby charity furnishing young people with restoration skills (7th Nov, 2017)

Local organisation helps young people learn through bicycle and furniture refurbishment

Remake, Re-use, Recycle is the mantra for a charity in Knowsley which is giving disadvantaged young people a helping hand by training them in practical refurbishment and repairing skills.

The Kirkby-based Centre 63 has used money from a local waste prevention fund to establish the ReMake Yourself Hub, which is working to equip vulnerable young people with a range of upcycling abilities to repair unwanted furniture and bicycles.

Centre 63 is a Church of England Youth Centre which provides community education, activities, initiatives and recreation for young people in Knowsley and Liverpool. The £15,000 of funding for the project has come from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority (MRWA) and Veolia Community Fund, which was set up to help support waste prevention, re-use and recycling projects locally.

Jeane Lowe, Centre 63 Manager, said: “In providing work experience and accredited courses we are guaranteeing improved knowledge, skills and qualifications for young people in the area.”

The bike repair scheme is giving young people the opportunity to learn about cycle repair and maintenance, as well as earn their own bike so that they are better able to access education, training and employment.

The upholstery training includes hands on skills such as assembling and repairing furniture, machinist techniques, manual work and cleaning, repairing and refurbishing old furniture. Students will also be taught to repurpose items, such as using carpentry work to transform reclaimed wood into shelving, cupboards and tables.

Materials for the work come from vacant properties and public donations. Centre 63 is hoping to open a pop-up shop in Kirkby town centre on a temporary basis where the refurbished items can be sold to the public.

By the end of the Community Fund project in March 2018, Centre 63 expects that they will have:
• Delivered six 4-week ‘earn a bike and bicycle’ maintenance workshops to a minimum of 120 young people aged 16-25.
• Provided a bike lending scheme to 140 members of the wider community who have low incomes and transportation difficulties.
• Supported young people to have refurbished 250 bikes for the wider community.
• Engaged twelve young people through Centre 63’s Tenancy Support Programme to undertake volunteering and training in upholstery.
• Diverted 380 bikes and 18 tonnes of material from landfill.

Sisters Sammy and Kim Dumont are just two young people for who the scheme has made a difference. Sammy said: “The Remake Yourself Hub has been so good for me and my sister; it has helped us to grow in confidence and gives us something useful to do. Knowing that we are helping others by upcycling high quality furniture makes us feel so valued.

“Without the project we wouldn’t know what to do with ourselves, we have gained lots of skills, met lovely women in the group and have made some lovely things for our own homes out of unwanted materials. The project is brilliant and we should have more of them around.”

Councillor Graham Morgan, Chairperson of MRWA, said: “It’s inspiring to see the effect this project is having by equipping young people – who may not have had too many opportunities recently – with valuable new abilities, as well as giving them the confidence and reassurance that they can learn new skills.

“The cherry on the cake is that this project is giving a new lease of life to old furniture and bikes, meaning valuable materials will be diverted from landfill. The ReMake Yourself Hub is the exact type of project that the Community Fund is made for.”

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Notes to editors

Image captions: Work experience students refurbishing old furniture in the Centre 63 workshop. Larger file sizes are available.

MRWA is a local government body with nine elected members from the five constituent councils in Merseyside. It organises and manages disposal of all waste collected by the five councils and operates 14 Household Waste Recycling Facilities. www.merseysidewda.gov.uk

The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 2017/18 has seen twelve community groups from Merseyside and Halton receive a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions. For more information see http://www.merseysidewda.gov.uk/waste-strategy/community-fund/mrwa-community-fund-201718/

John Lally
Marketing and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
General enquiries: 0151 255 1444
www.merseysidewda.gov.uk
www.twitter.com/merseysiderwa
www.facebook.com/merseysiderwa

Early years settings teach families how to cook healthy food and reduce waste

Nursery and Children’s Centre staff will be helping their children and families to cook and throw away less food thanks to the Mersey Waste Munchers.

20 early years settings from Merseyside and Halton will be taking part in training that teaches essential cooking skills and how to reduce food waste, so they can pass on their knowledge to the children and families they work with.

Mersey Waste Munchers, is run by the Children’s Food Trust’s Let’s Get Cooking experts and funded for a third year by the Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA) and Veolia Community Fund.

Claire Brennan, Health Promotion Worker/Deputy co-ordinator, at Garston Children’s Centre said: “This training will help the families as it will engage them to cook healthily and also understand the key food waste messages so they will minimize the amount of food they waste. They will learn that they can cook healthy food on a budget and save money for their family.”

Commenting on the recent delivery of the training, Maggie Sims, the Children’s Food Trust’s Head of Cookery, said: “We’re thrilled to have had this opportunity to take healthy cooking and waste prevention skills to young children and their families. We know that when children eat better they do better, so it’s never too early to start. Getting little ones excited about different tastes and textures is a brilliant way to get them off to a great start with their diet and create a lifelong healthy relationship with food.”

Councillor Graham Morgan, Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority, said: “Improving cookery skills is an important way to help reduce the amount of food thrown away on Merseyside, which costs families on average £700 a year. This is the fourth year we’ve put funding into the Mersey Waste Munchers project as it’s such a practical way to get people thinking about food and waste as a resource to be valued and not something that can just be thrown away.”

Since the first Mersey Waste Munchers projects started in 2014, participants have reported:

• 92% plan meals more efficiently by creating a list before shopping
• 64% chill or freeze leftovers to eat later instead of throwing away
• 70% avoid waste by checking the ‘use-by’ dates on packets and buying foods which aren’t about to go out of date
• 87% of families stated that they feel they have reduced the overall amount of food wasted by their family since their involvement with the project.

In the UK, 4.4 million tonnes of avoidable food and drink is wasted each year, worth £13 billion.

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For media enquiries, please call 07825 304799 or email media@childrensfoodtrust.org.uk

Notes to editors:

The Children’s Food Trust is a national charity on a mission to get every child eating better: at home, in childcare, at school and beyond. Follow us on Twitter @childfoodtrust and like us on Facebook. Registered charity number 1118995. The Trust sadly ceased trading at the end of September 2017.

(i) The MRWA and Veoila Community Fund was open to community and voluntary sector groups, not for profit social enterprises and schools in Merseyside and Halton.
(ii) MRWA operates (via a contract with Veolia) 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRC’s) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.
(iii) Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.
More information at: www.merseysidewda.gov.uk Twitter: @MerseysideRWA Facebook: MerseysideRWA

MERSEYSIDE RECYCLING CENTRES SWITCH TO SHORTER WINTER HOURS

Merseyside’s Recycling Centres are set to switch to their shorter winter opening hours.

From this Sunday 1st October the Centres will be open from 8.00am until 5.00pm* – changing from the summer hours of 8.00am to 8.00pm.

There are 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres in the region. They are operated by resource management company Veolia on behalf of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA).

Carl Beer, Chief Executive of MRWA, said: “We shorten the hours over the winter to coincide with the darker nights over the forthcoming months. Merseyside householders can use the Centres to recycle a host of items – from cans, car batteries and cardboard to garden waste, glass bottles and jars, paper, scrap metal, textiles and timber, and more.”

If you’re planning to visit a Recycling Centre in a van or with a long trailer then you will need a Permit to get in – visit www.merseysidewda.gov.uk or call 0151 236 0305. Alternatively download the Merseyside Recycling app from the App Store or Google Play Store.

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NOTES TO EDITORS:

From October 1st 2017 until March 31st 2018 Merseyside’s Household Waste Recycling Centres will be open from 8.00am until 5.00pm*. The Centres are located at:

Knowsley –
Huyton – Wilson Road – L36 6AD
Kirkby – Depot Road, Knowsley Industrial Park – L33 3AR

Liverpool –
Old Swan – Cheadle Avenue – L13 3AF
Otterspool – Jericho Lane, Aigburth – L17 5AR

Sefton –
Formby – Altcar Road, Formby – L37 8EG
Sefton Meadows – Sefton Lane, Maghull – L31 8BX
Southport – Foul Lane, Scarisbrick New Road – PR9 7RG
South Sefton – Irlam Road, Bootle – L20 4AE

St Helens –
Newton-le-Willows – Junction Lane – WA12 8DN
*Rainhill – Tasker Terrace, Rainhill – L35 4NX
Ravenhead – Burtonhead Road, St. Helens – WA9 5EA

Wirral –
Bidston – Wallasey Bridge Road, Birkenhead – CH41 1EB
Clatterbridge – Mount Road, Clatterbridge – CH63 4JZ
West Kirby – Greenbank Road – CH48 5HR

 

*NB:
Rainhill:
Monday to Friday: Open 8.00am-5.00pm
Saturdays: Open 9.00am-5.00pm
Sundays: Open 9.00am–3.00pm

 

MRWA is a local government body with nine elected members from the five constituent councils in Merseyside. It organises and manages disposal of all waste collected by the five councils and operates 14 Household Waste Recycling Facilities. www.merseysidewda.gov.uk

Mersey community groups scoop £115,000 from environment fund (9th May 2017)

Twelve community groups from Merseyside and Halton have received a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place.

The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions.

The £115,000 is coming from the Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund 2017/18, which has been running annually since 2006.

Some of the projects funded include:

– creating a sensory learning garden from re-used materials in St Helens

– the development of a shop in Wirral to sell used clothes

– the repair and re-use of unused furniture for redistribution to the local community in Halton

– cookery skills clubs to help reduce food waste across Merseyside and Halton

– bicycle repair and re-use in Knowsley

– timber waste re-use at a local community farm in Liverpool

– improving online retail skills for a charity shop in Sefton

Successful applicants have been awarded up to £25,000 for schemes which operate across Merseyside and Halton, and up to £8,000 for projects which work solely at local authority level.

Graham Morgan, Chairperson of MRWA, said: “These projects can have a significant impact on their local community and make Merseyside and Halton a cleaner and greener place for us all to live and work. Giving groups the opportunity to get involved in looking after their environment can only bring benefits to all and can help us appreciate items as valuable resources rather than something which otherwise might be just thrown away.

“The projects really seem to understand the importance of resource efficiency and community education. We’re really looking forward to seeing what they achieve.”

The Children’s Food Trust is one organisation to have previously benefitted from the Community Fund. Head of Cookery at the Trust, Maggie Sims, said: “We at The Children’s Food Trust are extremely grateful for the support our projects have received from the Community Fund. Food waste is something we are extremely passionate about tackling. We are working to reduce avoidable household food waste and to enable families to save money and the Community Fund has enabled us to do this.

“Thanks to previous funding we have trained 50 Merseyside and Halton leaders to run cookery clubs for families and communities reaching at least 2,500 children and adults. The club leaders have helped to educate about food waste and have increased cooking skills and in turn the fund is helping to create healthier lifestyles and environments for children as they grow up.”

Projects have until March 2018 to deliver their schemes.

The impact of the 2015/16 Fund saw 10 projects deliver 71 full time equivalent jobs (created or safeguarded), participation by 253 volunteers, 24,256 people directly engaged, 680 tonnes of waste material diverted from landfill and £68,000 of equivalent landfill costs avoided. Projects included refurbishing old bicycles, providing young adults with cookery skills, delivering workshops on textiles and clothes repair and training people to make attractive furniture from waste.

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Note to editors:

Pictures show previous Community Fund recipients Children’s Food Trust hosting a cookery skills club.

Details of each project:

Merseyside and Halton

The Children’s Food Trust – Mersey Waste Munchers

The Trust will expand on previous successes of the ‘Mersey Waste Munchers’ project, focusing on changing food waste behaviours throughout Merseyside and Halton. Amongst other things the project will provide training and resources to teach families how to change their food waste behaviour and run 20 ‘Mersey Waste Muncher’ clubs for adults with young children living in areas of high deprivation.

Neighbourhood Services Company – Crafting and Education for Reuse and Recycling of Waste Wood

Waste wood (fence panels, broken furniture, old doors and door frames etc.) from Registered Social Landlord properties will provide materials for a Craft Workshop at Home Farm in Croxteth where adults with learning difficulties will create garden and home products via fully supported therapeutic employment activities. The project will also introduce a ‘Crafting with Recycled Materials’ training programme to residents across the city region.

Halton

Groundwork Cheshire, Lancashire and Merseyside – Project UP

Project UP gives furniture a second life through reuse and redesign. This project will collect domestic furniture, upcycle it via the Project UP workshop and then redistribute it within the local community. It will mainly focus support to those most in need by providing furniture free of charge.

Knowsley

MerseyCycle – Learn to Bicycle Recycle

This project will see recovered bicycles recycled, workshops delivered for bike maintenance and repair, and community bicycle sales to the public at reduced costs.

Knowsley and Liverpool

Centre 63 – ReMake Yourself Hub

Funding will establish Centre 63 as a ‘ReMake yourself’ hub, specifically designed to upskill vulnerable and disadvantaged young people within the Knowsley and Liverpool district in a range of upcycling and refurbishment activities, including taking in unwanted furniture/bicycles from the community and selling them back at a low price.

Liverpool

Granby Toxteth Development Trust – Recycle L1578 and Beyond

The funding will help recycling and waste management projects and activities in the wards around GTDT on Lodge Lane including Picton, Princes Park and Greenbank as well as Kensington Fields and Riverside. The Trust will continue to work with MRWA to develop models of good practice within communities to create packages of support which promote good recycling practices and help to change people’s behaviour.

Liverpool Guild of Students – Leave Liverpool Tidy

Leave Liverpool Tidy is a reduce, re-use and recycle project which reduces the amount of reusable items going to landfill. This is achieved through the collection of unwanted items from both the Dales area and University Halls of Residence. These donated items are then redistributed to those who need them; traditionally this has been those in the local community and students.

St Helens

Carmel College – Foundation Learning Sensory Garden

The grant will help create a dedicated ‘safe space’ for students within their Foundation Learning programme – a course which supports personal and social development, and employability skills for students with learning difficulties, such as ASD, MLD and Down’s Syndrome. The project itself will be an opportunity for students to contribute and enhance their skills while an existing space will be upgraded using a range of ‘traditional’ household waste (food and drink packaging, house/garden furniture, tyres, etc.) to help create ‘sensory pockets’ across the garden for students to engage with.

Sefton

Emmaus Merseyside – e-Cycling

E-Cycling is about giving volunteers and staff at the Emmaus charity superstores the skills to establish the recycling social enterprise at a higher level: to establish it as an e-business, where it can raise further and wider awareness of recycling through social media, and where the public can both recycle and purchase recycled and upcycled goods online.

Wirral

Tomorrow’s Women Wirral – New to You

The project ‘New to You’ is to set up a charity shop within the Tomorrow’s Women Wirral centre. It will give local women the opportunity to gain retail experience, whilst continually learning about recycling and re-using and act as an opportunity to showcase to visitors how women can make a real difference with the learning gained and how it can be disseminated into the community.

Wirral Change – Go Green

A Community Reward Scheme will target local disadvantaged and Black & Minority Ethnic households, who have a disproportionately low level of awareness of waste prevention, recycling and reuse. Residents who sign up to the scheme will agree to a target to reduce their household waste. In return, households that meet their target will receive a reward to sustain and make other positive changes at home to prevent waste, and encourage reuse and recycling with a focus on textiles, food and garden waste. Awareness sessions and ‘green’ activities will be delivered in community group settings and events which will promote the project to communities and promote positive changes in the home.

Wirral Hospice St John’s – Supporting Patient Care Through Recycling and Reuse

This project aims to encourage more Wirral residents to help us re-use and recycle their unwanted and preloved items and generate income for local hospice care. The grant will help to deliver reuse initiatives and events, recycling projects and volunteering opportunities.

 

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

 

Media contact:

John Lally
Marketing and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
Direct Dial: 0151 255 2568
General enquiries: 0151 255 1444
www.merseysidewda.gov.uk
www.twitter.com/merseysiderwa
www.facebook.com/merseysiderwa

 

Longer hours for Merseyside Recycling Centres

Merseyside residents will have the opportunity to recycle more from Saturday 1st April as the region’s Household Waste Recycling Centres open for an extra three hours every day.

The 14 Recycling Centres, which are provided by Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA) and operated by resource management company Veolia, will be switching to their summer opening hours, meaning they’ll be open from 8.00am until 8.00pm*, seven days a week.

The Recycling Centres are situated throughout the region with all 14 available to use for all Merseyside householders. They accept all sorts of household materials for recycling, from batteries, cans and cardboard, through to garden clippings, glass bottles, furniture, soil, timber, electrical items and white goods, plus much more.

A Van Permit scheme is in operation at all the sites meaning if you are planning to use a van or large trailer then you will need a Permit. Permits are free of charge.

Further details about Merseyside’s Household Waste Recycling Centres and the Permit Scheme can be found at www.merseysidewda.gov.uk or by calling MRWA on 0151 255 1444.

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Notes to editors:
From 1st April 2017 until 30th September 2017 Merseyside’s Household Waste Recycling Centres will be open from 8.00am until 8.00pm. The Centres can be found at:

Merseyside Household Waste Recycling Centres:

Bidston – Wallasey Bridge Road, Birkenhead CH41 1EB
Clatterbridge – Mount Road, Clatterbridge CH63 6JE
Formby – Altcar Road, Formby L37 8EG
Huyton – Wilson Road, Huyton L36 6AD
Kirkby – Depot Road, Knowsley Industrial Park L33 3AR
Newton-le-Willows – Junction Lane WA12 8DN
Old Swan – Cheadle Avenue – L13 3AF
Otterspool – Jericho Lane, Aigburth L17 5AR
Rainhill – Tasker Terrace, Rainhill L35 4NX
Ravenhead – Burtonhead Road, St. Helens WA9 5EA
Sefton Meadows – Sefton Lane, Maghull L31 8BX
Southport – Foul Lane, Scarisbrick New Road PR9 7RG
South Sefton – Irlam Road, Bootle L20 4AE
West Kirby – Greenbank Road CH48 5HR

*NB. Rainhill: Open 9.00am–6.00pm on Saturdays; 9.00am–3.00pm on Sundays
MRWA is a local government body with nine elected members from the five constituent councils in Merseyside. It organises and manages disposal of all waste collected by the five councils and provides14 Household Waste Recycling Facilities, which are operated by Veolia.

Charity’s re-use initiative celebrates success (24 Feb 2017)

A unique charity is celebrating after its new furniture reuse project has gone from strength to strength.

The HoneyRose Foundation is the only UK charity that helps grant special wishes to adults (age 40+) from all over the United Kingdom, (and over 20 years of age in the Merseyside area) who are suffering from life threatening illnesses. It’s project team in St Helens has recently been supported with a £3000 grant from the Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA) and Veolia Community Fund.

The project aims to repair and upcycle a range of furniture and other household items to be sold at affordable prices at the charity’s shop in the centre of St Helens. The grant has assisted the charity in acquiring an improved storage facility, and in the future the development of a workshop area, for furniture and other household items donated for reuse and recycling. In addition the charity supports a range of other initiatives including training, job and volunteer opportunities for local people.

Cllr Graham Morgan, Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority said: “We’re thrilled with the success of this project – by supporting the HoneyRose Foundation with resources to develop the new storage unit, it’s enabled them to collect, reuse and repair huge quantities of furniture and household items, which would otherwise have been thrown away and sent to landfill. They’ve been able to give all of these things a ‘second life’ in homes across the local area.”

Cllr Alan Cunliffe, MRWA’s St Helens Council member said: “This is an excellent local project that’s delivering a great service to communities across St Helens and the Authority is pleased that through the Community Fund grant we can contribute to its success.”

Billy Duffy, Chairman, from HoneyRose Foundation said: “The support of the MRWA has been invaluable in helping us with this project, and the donations of goods from the local community has out stripped all of our estimates….a massive thank you.”

The support will continue until the end of March this year, and project leaders are already making plans to continue the project which will be integrated into the charity’s local operations.

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PICTURE CAPTION:  Left to right (front row) Dave Roberts (HoneyRose Foundation), Christine O’Brien (Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority), Lynn Duffy MBE (Founder HoneyRose Foundation)
Left to right (back row) Tom Kelsall (HoneyRose Foundation, Cllr Alan Cunliffe Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority St. Helens Council member, Billy Duffy (HoneyRose Foundation),

Media contact: Colette Gill, MRWA Communications and Marketing Officer, Tel: 0151 255 2527 colette.gill@merseysidewda.gov.uk

Notes for Editors
(i) The MRWA Community Fund was open to community and voluntary sector groups, not for profit social enterprises and schools in Merseyside and Halton.
(ii) MRWA operates (via a contract with Veolia Environmental Services) 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRC’s) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.
(iii) Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.
(iv) More information at: www.merseysidewda.gov.uk Twitter: @MerseysideRWA             Facebook: MerseysideRWA
(v) More information about the Honey Rose Foundation can be found at www.honeyrosefoundation.org.uk

Furniture transformation project supporting homeless initiatives (12 Jan 2017)

A project supporting homeless people in Sefton is using upcycling and furniture restoration training to enable homeless and unemployed people to get back into their own accommodation and gain valuable employment skills.

The ‘Upcycle It (Sefton) Project is run by the Emmaus Merseyside charity, and has been supported by a £8,000 Community Fund Grant from the Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA) and Veolia Community Fund to set up the project which produces a range of upcycled and restored furniture to be sold in their Superstore in Sefton.

The project is currently training six individuals including Margi Allen who said: “The Up-Cycle It project is great. We get training in how to change old shabby pieces of furniture into attractive articles again. We improve our skills whilst things that might be thrown away can be given a new life! Everyone wins!”

Nigel Mellor, Chair of Board of Trustees for Emmaus in Merseyside said: “The training will give our volunteers even more useful skills which we need to reuse and recycle more household items donated by the public. Many of the volunteers are unemployed so we hope the skills training and volunteer experience will ultimately help them get back into employment. The project also helps to reduce the amount of waste sent to landfill.”

Cllr Graham Morgan, Chairperson of MRWA said: “We’re pleased to be supporting a project that proves its value by not only improving people’s lives – but also diverting furniture from landfill.

Carl Beer, MRWA Chief Executive said: “It’s great to see items that would have been thrown away get a ‘second life’.”

The project is running for the next three months – with the hope that the training will continue and will be integrated into the operations of the Superstore.

All upcycled furniture is available to buy from the Emmaus Superstore, 38 Sandy Road, Seaforth, Sefton, L21 3TW
Tel: 0151 9281588, Opening hours Mon – Sat, 10.00am – 4.00 pm.

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Image caption L to R: Carl Beer, Chief Executive – Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority, Cllr Graham Morgan, Chairperson Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority, Annie Crew (Emmaus), Margi Allen (Emmaus) and Nigel Mellor, Chair of Board of Trustees for Emmaus in Merseyside.

For media enquiries please contact Colette Gill, Tel: 0151 255 2527 colette.gill@merseysidewda.gov.uk
Notes for editors

(i) The MRWA Community Fund was open to community and voluntary sector groups, not for profit social enterprises and schools in Merseyside and Halton.

(ii) Emmaus Merseyside – ‘Upcycle It’ (Sefton) Project: ‘Upcycle It’ is about giving homeless people the skills to design and make attractive furniture and household accessories from waste otherwise destined for landfill. Customers at the Emmaus superstore in Seaforth will be buying the fashionable upcycled products created by volunteers.

(iii) MRWA operates (via a contract with Veolia Environmental Services) 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRC’s) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.

(iv) Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

£115,000 waste prevention fund for Merseyside and Halton community groups

A share of £115,000 is up for grabs to help make the region a cleaner and greener place.

The funding has been made available for Merseyside and Halton community and voluntary groups, schools, faith groups and not-for-profit organisations, who can reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions.

The money is coming from the Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund 2017/18, which has been running annually since 2006.

The impact of the 2015/16 Fund saw 10 projects deliver 71 full time equivalent jobs (created or safeguarded), participation by 253 volunteers, 24,256 people directly engaged, 680 tonnes of waste material diverted from landfill and £68,000 of equivalent landfill costs avoided.

Previous Community Fund projects have included:

– Taking in unwanted bikes and cheap bikes from auctions, refurbishing them to ‘as new’ quality and selling them at an affordable price to the local community as well as teaching people bicycle repair and maintenance.

– Targeting young adults aged 16-25 and providing a two-day course, arming club leaders with the skills and support to establish ‘Mersey Waste Muncher’ cookery clubs that focus on reducing food waste.
– Delivering a series of learning workshops enabling people to gain skills to revitalise unwanted furniture and textiles.

– Training homeless people with the skills to design and make attractive furniture and household accessories from waste, with the items going on sale at the Emmaus Superstore in Seaforth.

– Reducing the amount of reusable items going to landfill at the end of the academic year by collecting unwanted materials from student accommodation and redistributing cleaned and repaired items back to new students and the local community.

– Re-using waste wood from domestic properties and gardens to improve visitor facilities and livestock conditions at Home Farm in Croxteth Park and providing training opportunities in re-use.

Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA), Councillor Graham Morgan, said: “We’ve made this money available for new and existing projects which can have an impact on their local community and make Merseyside and Halton a cleaner and greener place for us all to live and work.

“Giving groups the opportunity to get involved in looking after their environment can only bring benefits to all and can help us appreciate items as valuable resources rather than something which otherwise might be just thrown away.”

Interested groups should complete and submit an Expression of Interest with MRWA. If applicants are shortlisted then they will be asked to fill in a more detailed Community Fund entry.

Successful applicants can be awarded up to £25,000 for schemes which operate across Merseyside and Halton, and £8,000 for projects which work solely at local authority level.

Projects will have eleven months to deliver their schemes and will be expected to get started in May.

Centre 63 (pictured above) are one organisation to have benefitted from the Community Fund. Jeane Lowe, Chief Executive Officer at Centre 63, said: “The Community Fund has been pivotal in enabling ‘Bike Back 63’ to take in unwanted bikes from the Knowsley community and refurbish them for local residents to re-use and also to help reduce the need for car journeys within the Borough. This support has also enabled us to upskill young people who are NEET (Not in Employment, Education or Training) and isolated older adults to become bike mechanics and repair old unwanted bikes which are donated back into the community.

“We have also delivered a popular ‘Earn-a-bike scheme’, ‘Bike loan scheme’ and taught over 150 children and young people how to ride a bike and simple bike maintenance techniques.”

Organisations interested in this year’s Community Fund can:
– Download the Expression of Interest Form and Guidance at www.merseysidewda.gov.uk

– Contact the Authority by Email: communityfund2017-18@merseysidewda.gov.uk / Tel: 0151 255 2526

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF EXPRESSION OF INTEREST: 1st February 2017

ENDS

Note to editors

– The Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund is open to community and voluntary sector groups, faith groups, not for profit social enterprises and schools in Merseyside and Halton.

– MRWA operates (via a contract with Veolia) 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRC’s) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.

– Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

Media enquiries:

John Lally
Marketing and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
Direct Dial: 0151 255 2568
John.lally@merseysidewda.gov.uk
General enquiries: 0151 255 1444

Save money and waste less this Christmas (1 Dec 2016)

Struggling to find gifts for loved ones? It’s never too late – just shop smart!

Local recycling officers are asking people to shop smart this Christmas in a bid to save money and create less waste.

December can be a time when we tend to overindulge, that’s why Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority have come up with tips to follow so local residents can slim their shopping, cut their clutter and make their money go further.

Councillor Graham Morgan, Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA), said: “At this time of year you can end up with a lot of clutter around the house, too much food and a lot of paper, card and plastic which unnecessarily ends up in landfill. By planning what you buy, using what you already have, making lists and shopping smarter you will save yourself time and money as well as creating less waste.

“Food and clothes are two particular things that people can end up spending too much on, when there are ways of saving money and still getting what you want.”

Our top waste prevention tips:

• Before you go out shopping write a list and stick to it, as you’re less likely to make an impulsive and unnecessary buy which you didn’t need.

• When out shopping remember to take re-usable bags with you.

• Consider buying an experience for someone – concert tickets, a pampering day, or tickets to a tourist attraction.

• 30% of our clothes haven’t been worn in the last year so search the back of wardrobes and drawers to find your party outfit rather than buying a new one.

• Accessorise – bring an old outfit to life by customising it with some new additions.

• Instead of wrapping paper, use gift bags which have got a much longer life and can be used over and over again.

• When it comes to meals try planning in advance when and what you’re going to be cooking, that way you won’t buy too much. Research from Christmas 2015* showed that British shoppers spent £2.3bn on food items in the two weeks to Christmas – an 8.8% increase in food expenditure compared to the same period in 2014.

• Cook once eat twice – by carefully cooking more than you need and freezing the extra portions you can eat them another time.

• Non-frozen leftovers should be wrapped, kept in the fridge and eaten within two days. Use clear takeaway containers to help you see what you have left and maybe add the date on the packet when you put it in the freezer.

• If you’ve got a home composter then remember to add in Christmas leftovers like fruit and veg peelings. Also add unwanted paper and card. And if you haven’t got a composter, then maybe ask for one as a gift!

• Remember to take full advantage of your local Household Waste Recycling Centre. There are 14 throughout Merseyside with most accepting a whole host of items such as cans, cardboard, real Christmas trees, glass jars and bottles, paper, scrap metal, textiles, toys and white goods. All the Centres accept electrical items.

• If there are items like toys, electrical items, bric-a-brac you don’t need after Christmas, you could donate them to the Emmaus Community Reuse Shop at our South Sefton Recycling Centre.

Carl Beer, Chief Executive of MRWA, said: “A huge amount of rubbish is generated at this time of year but alongside that there is a great opportunity to promote a message of saving money, consuming less, creating less waste and recycling as much as we can.”

For more recycling and waste prevention tips and Christmas recipe ideas visit www.recycleformerseysideandhalton.com.

ENDS
Notes to editor:

*http://www.foodbev.com/news/uks-christmas-food-spending-grows-8-8-to-2-3bn/

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is a statutory authority established in 1986, following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, to undertake the household waste disposal functions for local authorities across Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and the safe and effective disposal of household waste for Merseyside’s residents.

The Merseyside and Halton Waste Partnership is made up of MRWA, plus the District Councils of Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Knowsley.
www.merseysidewda.gov.uk
www.twitter.com/merseysiderwa
www.facebook.com/merseysiderwa

Media enquiries:

John Lally
Marketing and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
Direct Dial: 0151 255 2568
General enquiries: 0151 255 1444
www.merseysidewda.gov.uk
www.twitter.com/merseysiderwa
www.facebook.com/merseysiderwa