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Mersey community project gets creative with recycling (20 November 2018)

It’s a case of ‘so far, sew good’ for a community scheme in Northwood, Kirkby, that is using creative arts and crafts to help encourage recycling.

The Northwood CommuniTree 4aRts project is working across the Northwood area in a bid to engage local residents and get them to think about reducing waste and boosting re-use and recycling.

The project is being delivered by Faiths4Change – a registered charity which uses arts, health and wellbeing activities to engage with communities on environmental matters – in partnership with Northwood Together and Knowsley Council.

Faiths4Change has received over £7000 of funding for the project, which comes from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund 2018/19. The Fund was set up to help support waste prevention, re-use and recycling projects locally.

Northwood in Kirkby has traditionally low levels of recycling. By working with the Community Fund and Knowsley Council, Faiths4Change hope to create clear and consistent behavioural change messages through arts and crafts activities to help the local community turn these statistics around.

The project will conclude with the Northwood ‘CommuniTree’ Resources exhibition featuring items created by local people at the workshops, a 3D CommuniTree sculpture made of recycled plastic bottles and a canopy made from recycled materials such as textiles.

Liz Atherton, Arts & Wellbeing Project Co-ordinator at Faiths4Change, said: “By bringing together old and young, groups, schools, and organisations from across Northwood we can all create a really positive environmental noise about, with and for the area. There is a wonderful community spirit here and you see it every day at the Community Centre.

“Ultimately the project is about helping to build community spirit, break down barriers and provide educational benefits to enable all to improve the environment for future generations in Northwood.”

By the end of the project in March 2019, Faiths4Change expect that they will have:

– Re-used or recycled 6.7 tonnes of materials (including textiles, plastics and bulky family items such as cots and prams)

– Held 6 Swap Shops for textiles, bulky items and toys

– Held 12 clothing repair clinics

– Hosted 64 sewing and craft workshops to create ‘textile tree banners’

– Delivered recycling guides directly to 500 households

– Engaged with 8 schools for Bags2School clothing collections

Twelve volunteering opportunities have also been created in partnership with Northwood Together. Faiths4Change are hoping that local volunteers, with the right support, will encourage engagement amongst family, peers and neighbours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lou Smith is one local resident for whom the scheme has made a difference. Lou said: “I’ve been getting involved in the sewing classes, the Pop Up Boutiques and making art work for Northwood Community Centre. There’s a really nice, friendly atmosphere and it’s been great to dust off the sewing skills I haven’t used for a few years. You just hope that it does have an effect and people in the area will start recycling more – I’m sure they will. It’s a great community and people just need the right information to help them do what they need to do.”

Councillor Tony Concepcion, Chairperson of MRWA, said: “The best Community Fund projects are those that help deliver recycling and waste resource messages to local communities – using groups’ expertise and on-the-ground knowledge of particular areas and the people who live there. The work Faiths4Change and the Northwood Together are doing will see a positive effect on recycling levels.”

ENDS

Image captions (left to right):
MRWA_F4C 1   Marlene Robinson, Lisa Cover, Liz Atherton and Julia Adlington stitch the Northwood CommuniTree.
MRWA_F4C 2  Julia Adlington, Liz Atherton, Marlene Robinson and Lisa Cover stitch the Northwood CommuniTree.

MRWA is a local government body with nine elected members from the five constituent councils in Merseyside. It organises and manages disposal of all waste collected by the five councils and operates 14 Household Waste Recycling Facilities. www.merseysidewda.gov.uk

The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 2018/19 has seen 14 community groups from Merseyside and Halton receive a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions.

Members of the media for more information please contact:

John Lally
Marketing and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
Direct Dial: 0151 255 2568
John.lally@merseysidewda.gov.uk
General enquiries: 0151 255 1444

Kirkby charity furnishing young people with restoration skills (7th Nov, 2017)

Local organisation helps young people learn through bicycle and furniture refurbishment

Remake, Re-use, Recycle is the mantra for a charity in Knowsley which is giving disadvantaged young people a helping hand by training them in practical refurbishment and repairing skills.

The Kirkby-based Centre 63 has used money from a local waste prevention fund to establish the ReMake Yourself Hub, which is working to equip vulnerable young people with a range of upcycling abilities to repair unwanted furniture and bicycles.

Centre 63 is a Church of England Youth Centre which provides community education, activities, initiatives and recreation for young people in Knowsley and Liverpool. The £15,000 of funding for the project has come from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority (MRWA) and Veolia Community Fund, which was set up to help support waste prevention, re-use and recycling projects locally.

Jeane Lowe, Centre 63 Manager, said: “In providing work experience and accredited courses we are guaranteeing improved knowledge, skills and qualifications for young people in the area.”

The bike repair scheme is giving young people the opportunity to learn about cycle repair and maintenance, as well as earn their own bike so that they are better able to access education, training and employment.

The upholstery training includes hands on skills such as assembling and repairing furniture, machinist techniques, manual work and cleaning, repairing and refurbishing old furniture. Students will also be taught to repurpose items, such as using carpentry work to transform reclaimed wood into shelving, cupboards and tables.

Materials for the work come from vacant properties and public donations. Centre 63 is hoping to open a pop-up shop in Kirkby town centre on a temporary basis where the refurbished items can be sold to the public.

By the end of the Community Fund project in March 2018, Centre 63 expects that they will have:
• Delivered six 4-week ‘earn a bike and bicycle’ maintenance workshops to a minimum of 120 young people aged 16-25.
• Provided a bike lending scheme to 140 members of the wider community who have low incomes and transportation difficulties.
• Supported young people to have refurbished 250 bikes for the wider community.
• Engaged twelve young people through Centre 63’s Tenancy Support Programme to undertake volunteering and training in upholstery.
• Diverted 380 bikes and 18 tonnes of material from landfill.

Sisters Sammy and Kim Dumont are just two young people for who the scheme has made a difference. Sammy said: “The Remake Yourself Hub has been so good for me and my sister; it has helped us to grow in confidence and gives us something useful to do. Knowing that we are helping others by upcycling high quality furniture makes us feel so valued.

“Without the project we wouldn’t know what to do with ourselves, we have gained lots of skills, met lovely women in the group and have made some lovely things for our own homes out of unwanted materials. The project is brilliant and we should have more of them around.”

Councillor Graham Morgan, Chairperson of MRWA, said: “It’s inspiring to see the effect this project is having by equipping young people – who may not have had too many opportunities recently – with valuable new abilities, as well as giving them the confidence and reassurance that they can learn new skills.

“The cherry on the cake is that this project is giving a new lease of life to old furniture and bikes, meaning valuable materials will be diverted from landfill. The ReMake Yourself Hub is the exact type of project that the Community Fund is made for.”

ENDS

Notes to editors

Image captions: Work experience students refurbishing old furniture in the Centre 63 workshop. Larger file sizes are available.

MRWA is a local government body with nine elected members from the five constituent councils in Merseyside. It organises and manages disposal of all waste collected by the five councils and operates 14 Household Waste Recycling Facilities. www.merseysidewda.gov.uk

The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 2017/18 has seen twelve community groups from Merseyside and Halton receive a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions. For more information see http://www.merseysidewda.gov.uk/waste-strategy/community-fund/mrwa-community-fund-201718/

John Lally
Marketing and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
General enquiries: 0151 255 1444
www.merseysidewda.gov.uk
www.twitter.com/merseysiderwa
www.facebook.com/merseysiderwa

Community bike shop puts residents on road to work (20 Jan 2015)

A community bicycle organisation in one of Liverpool’s most deprived wards has helped hundreds of residents get on the road to work by repairing and reusing donated bikes and selling them on to local people at bargain prices.

The Onya Bike scheme in Kensington has sold more than 200 bikes – most of them to customers needing cheap transport for work– since it was set up nearly 18 months ago.

The scheme, backed by a £5,000 grant from the Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund, relies on unwanted bikes donated by the public and online auction sites . Bikes are then refurbished and made roadworthy by volunteer cycle mechanics.

Stephen Faragher, director of Kensington Vision CIC, which runs the Holt Road project, said: “We’ve had a great response from local people. We buy some bikes cheap on auction sites but we get about 20 bikes donated every month. We’ve got so many waiting to be fixed up or stripped down, we’ve had to take on extra storage space.
“We sell an average of five or six bikes a week. The vast majority are people who need something to get to work on.”

The shop, which also repairs customers’ own bikes, sells cycles for an average of around £40 each but charges more for some of its more unusual stock.
Mr Faragher said: “Mountain bikes are obviously popular but it’s surprising how many people are interested in folding bikes, and old racers as well. We’ve even got a rickshaw waiting to be prepared for sale and a World War II adults’ tricycle which is ready to go.”

Councillor Graham Morgan, Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority, said: “The Community Fund is about encouraging people to re-use and recycle resources. Onya Bike is doing just that and playing a big part in helping people in a very deprived area access employment opportunities and get healthy at the same time.”
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Picture caption: Left to right, MRWA waste strategy policy officer Glynn Stevenson, Onya volunteer Frank Maddocks and Kensington Vision CIC director Stephen Faragher inside the bike shop.

Note to editors
1. The MRWA Community Fund supports community and voluntary sector groups, not for profit social enterprises and schools in Merseyside and Halton.
2. MRWA operates (via a contract with Veolia) 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.
3. Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

Media enquiries to Jon Flinn on 0151 709 0505

Barcelona spotlight on recycling at Liverpool Farms (30 Nov 2015)

Two Merseyside farms are attracting international attention after launching a reuse and recycling project to save hundreds of tonnes of waste wood from landfill.

The project at Larkin’s Farm and Home Farm in Croxteth is transforming used furniture and garden fences from around Merseyside into sawdust for animal bedding, wood chippings for paths, bird boxes and railings at the popular attractions.

The Neighbourhood Services Company project, funded by the Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund, has been made a European demonstration project and attracted interest from Spain.

Alan Johnson of the Neighbourhood Services Company (NsC) said: “We employ people of all ages to reuse and recycle the wood we receive and would-be social entrepreneurs from Barcelona came over to see what they could learn about creating sustainable youth employment from similar schemes in their own city.”

The project, which received £17,500 from MRWA’s community fund, also aims to promote reuse and recycling closer to home by directly targeting visitors to both farm attractions as well as local schools and  people with learning difficulties – as well as saving 310 tonnes of waste material from landfill.

MRWA chairperson Councillor Graham Morgan said: “Community Fund investments are never simply about reducing environmental impact. There’s always a host of other benefits that ripple out and this is a great example of that.

“It’s great to have international acknowledgement of the project’s Merseyside success.”

The Neighbourhood Services Company has previously hosted visits from Lithuanian and Romanian delegations interested in transforming recycling projects into sustainable new businesses.

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Note to editors

  1. The Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund supports community and voluntary sector groups, not for profit social enterprises and schools in Merseyside and Halton.
  2. MRWA operates (via a contract with Veolia) 13 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.
  3. Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.
  4. 4. For information regarding the project or Neighbourhood Services Company, please contact Alan Johnson on 0151-546-5514.

MEDIA ENQUIRIES TO JON FLINN ON 0151 709 0505

Primary pupils spearhead permaculture revolution (14th Nov 2015)

Primary school pupils hope to spearhead a permaculture revolution by transforming their school garden with re-used car tyres and carpet, and composted kitchen waste.

Youngsters at Legh Vale Primary in Haydock have just received their second prestigious green flag award for their sustainable school garden but are hoping to boost their environmental credentials by creating a permaculture showcase in the grounds from re-used and recycled materials.

Pupils, who have won £4,400 from Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority and Veolia’s Community Fund for their latest project, will transform the space re-using tyres for planters and banks, carpets for weed barriers, canteen waste as compost and host of other items which would otherwise end up in landfill.

Legh Vale Primary headteacher Andy Howard said: “We’re in the middle of Haydock but have lovely grounds that we make the most of. We’ve had a sustainable garden since 2012 but wanted to take things further to really encourage recycling and reuse of waste.

“The idea is to use it to promote simple and innovative ideas to a wider local audience so they can find new ways to reduce waste and have fun doing it.”

The school plans to use the permaculture garden for a series of teacher training sessions (led by specialists, Ecolibrium) and other events encouraging local families to recycle and reuse more of their own household waste.

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority Chairperson Councillor Graham Morgan said: “The great thing about the Legh Vale project is that it is not just encouraging the school’s pupils to become more aware of recycling and waste.

“It’s got real potential to help the whole community change the way they treat household waste and so has an invaluable role to play in reducing Merseyside’s reliance on landfill.”

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Picture caption
Images show Legh Vale pupils with headteacher Andy Howard (back, right) and MRWA waste strategy policy officer Glynn Stephenson in the school garden.

Note to editors
1. The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund supports community and voluntary sector groups, not for profit social enterprises and schools in Merseyside and Halton.
2. MRWA operates (via a contract with Veolia ) 13 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.
3. Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

MEDIA ENQUIRIES TO JON FLINN ON 0151 709 0505

Grant nourishes community garden plan (5th October 2015)

A plan to transform a disused St Helens sports field into community allotments has got off to a flying start.

Gardeners at Billinge Community Allotments have taken delivery of a total of 36 water butts after winning funding from Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority and Veolia’s Community Fund.

The delivery means gardeners – who include local residents, three primary schools, disability groups and a scout troop – now have water supplies ‘on tap’ for each plot.

St Helens MBC ward Councillor Dennis McDonnell, founder of Billinge Horticultural Society, said: “The water barrels will collect waste rainwater reducing demand on public water supplies and give each plot its own available supply.

“The growing of crops on the allotments will reduce the demand for food at the supermarkets resulting in tons of food packaging not going to landfill. Communal composting at the site will also reduce gardening waste that would otherwise have had to be collected by St Helens Council.

“With local children due to be educated in Environmental Gardening at the plots it’s a win situation for all of us and a lesson in the importance of re-cycling.”

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority and Veolia awarded the project £1,800 from its annual community fund as part of its commitment to reducing food waste.

MRWA chairperson Councillor Graham Morgan said: “The community allotments are a fantastic project which will make a difference to hundreds of local people.

“The real benefit for us is that it’s helping reduce food waste by encouraging residents to grow their own fruit and veg and compost any food waste that they do produce.”

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Note to Editors

1.    The MRWA Community Fund supports community and voluntary sector groups, not for profit social enterprises and schools in Merseyside and Halton.

2.    MRWA operates (via a contract with Veolia ) 13 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.

3.    Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following

the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

Picture caption

The attached image shows Councillor McDonnell, far left, and MRWA Waste Strategy Policy Officer Glynn Stevenson, far right, with allotment holders on the Billinge site.

Media Enquiries to Jon Flinn on 0151 709 0505

Trash to Treasure re-use workshops in Granby and Toxteth (30 Jan, 2015)

Granby and Toxteth Development Trust will be running a series of FREE re-use workshops throughout February.

LOCATION: The Old Library, Lodge Lane

4th Feb – Jewellery making

11th Feb – Clothes swishing

18th Feb – Bag making

25th Feb – Furniture restoration

All workshops take place on a Wednesday, between 1.00pm and 4.00pm.

For more information call Julie on 0151 734 4925 or email learn@gtdt.co.uk

Recycling campaign targets Liverpool students with lessons in furniture restoration

Free workshops for Smithdown students in February.

A recycling campaign will target Liverpool’s student population by showing them how to restore their own furniture and transform unwanted items of clothing and jewellery.

The special workshops will give students living in the Smithdown Road area practical skills which they can use to get the most out of unwanted household items.

The 3 hour sessions take place on each Wednesday in February at the old library in Lodge Lane. They have been funded by the Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority’s Community Fund and organised by the Granby Toxteth Development Trust (GTDT) as part of its Making L1578 Even Greener initiative.

Julie Aitcheson, of GTDT, said: “Students often move to the area from other local authorities and are living independently for the first time so don’t necessarily know about what can and can’t be put out for recycling.

“The workshops will pass on some of this basic knowledge and give students valuable skills which they can use to extend the life of items as diverse as old furniture and clothing which they would otherwise have thrown away.”

The Trust also hopes the sessions will play a part in helping connect some of the many communities that live locally and provide some relief from exam revision.

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority chairperson Councillor Graham Morgan said: “Liverpool has a huge population of students and they all have a role to play in helping cut the amount of waste we have to send to landfill.

“Sessions like these are a great idea, not just because they encourage recycling but because they help build a real sense of civic pride.”

The free recycling workshops take place from 1-4pm on February 4, 11, 18 and 25th. Students wishing to attend can turn up on the day or contact the Granby Toxteth Development Trust on 0151 734 4925 for more information.

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Note to editors

  1. The MRWA Community Fund was open to community and voluntary sector groups, not for profit social enterprises and schools in Merseyside and Halton. The Granby Toxteth Development Trust’s Making L1578 Even Greener project was awarded £10,000.
  1. MRWA operates (via a contract with Veolia Environmental Services) 13 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRC’s) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.
  2. Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

MEDIA ENQUIRIES TO JON FLINN ON 0151 709 0505